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Events

Special Events at Fairmount

Families F.I.R.S.T. (Families Investing Recovery & in Supporting Treatment) Program

It can be stressful when a loved one is suffering from mental illness.

Families F.I.R.S.T. is a program designed to support families who have been dealing with a loved one who suffers from mental illness. Our program will focus on education, recognizing red flags, resources in the community, answering questions you may have about your loved ones symptoms and overall support for one another. We meet to discuss various symptoms of mental illness in a supportive environment. If you have a loved one that is currently at Fairmount Behavioral Health please feel free to attend. Our goal is to support the families in our community so they do not feel alone. The Families F.I.R.S.T. Program is held by appointment only. To make an appointment or for questions regarding the program, please call Rebecca Smith, LPC 215-487-4189.

 


Getting Comfortable with Self Injury: Personal Perspectives on Identifying, Understanding, and Responding

Talya Lewis, BA, Peer Educator

Date: November 1, 2019
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Fairmount Behavioral Health System, 561 Fairthorne Ave. Philadelphia PA 19128
CEU’S: 5
Cost: $139 per person, lunch included
*Fee includes CEU’s, presentation, all handouts, certificate, continental breakfast, buffet lunch, PM refreshments, For more information call 610-203-1926

Description:

This seminar is designed to assist professionals and care givers in identifying and responding to self-injury via an exploration of the underlying motivations of the behavior and ways to effectively respond. Both clinical and personal experiences provide invaluable insight into the mind of the individual who self-injures, allowing the mental health professional to better connect with, validate and empathize with those who engage in this behavior. The presenter, Talya Lewis, has been on the receiving end of the intense stigma that accompanies serious behavioral health issues. She has been inspired by her own history to educate those working in clinical and other service settings by conducting workshops to foster an understanding of SI, building a greater sense of compassion for the individuals for whom we provide services.

Workshop Objectives:

  1. Review and learn statistics regarding self-injury
  2. Learn from the trainer’s personal insight and direct experiences with self-injury
  3. Learn at least three common traits of the typical person who self-injures
  4. Learn at least two typical misconceptions about self-injury
  5. Be able to identify the six main reasons why people self-injure
  6. Learn the course of self-injury and the instruments commonly used
  7. Identify the reinforcing cycle for self-injury and its causes
  8. Be able to identify early warning signs of self-injury
  9. Learn at least three techniques for responding to self-injury
  10. Learn and practice how to assess clients who self-injure and what and how to ask about it
  11. Understand Trauma Reenactment as a model for working with self-injury
  12. Understand validation techniques and practice the use of validation skills

Agenda:

Time: Description:
9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Registration, continental breakfast.
9:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Introduction, statistics regarding self-injury.
10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Trainer’s personal insight and direct experiences with self-injury; review of common traits of person who self-injures, typical misconceptions about self-injury, six main reasons why people self-injure
11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. The course of self-injury and the instruments commonly used, the reinforcing cycle for self-injury and its causes, identification of early warning signs, learning new strategies.
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m. Lunch (buffet lunch included)
1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Techniques for responding to self-injury; how to assess clients who self-injure and what and how to ask.
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Break
2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m. Trauma Reenactment as a model for working with self-injury; validation techniques and an exercise in the use of validation skills.
3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Questions, discussion, summary, evaluations.

CEU Hours:

This event is co-sponsored by Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research (GSSWSR) for a maximum of 5 credit hours. Bryn Mawr College GSSWSR, as a CSWE accredited School of Social Work, is a pre-approved provider of continuing education for Social Workers, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists in Pennsylvania and many other states.

About the Speaker:

Talya Lewis Psychoanalytic Fellow (Academic), Peer Educator, is an animated, articulate, and passionate presenter who has captivated audiences throughout the region, including those from the Mental Health Association of Southeastern PA, Gaudenzia House, Girls Space, the Montgomery County Behavioral Health Court, Montgomery County Youth Center, Psychiatric Nursing Conference, 2009, Behavioral Health Training and Education Network (BHTEN) in Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Drexel University, College of Nursing and Health Professions, LaSalle University, and was a guest on Dan Gottlieb’s Voices in the Family radio program, WHYY/NPR and Maiken Scott’s Morning Edition.

Talya now facilitates two support groups, one for women who have traits consistent with BPD and trauma and one for parents/caregivers to help ease their isolation and to equip them with the education necessary to cope and respond effectively to their loved one. She co-developed and co-authored a manual for a ten-week workshop on working with borderline disorder (a diagnosis that is often linked with trauma) and bipolar disorder (often co-morbid with bpd). As she worked with those struggling with this painful symptomology as well as their loved ones, Talya was asked repeatedly by people desperate for help to enter treatment with her. She now has a private practice as a successful trauma coach or “lay therapist.”As her final venture, her most cathartic yet most difficult project, Talya has written her memoir, The Boom Boom Retreat, a deeply moving personal account. With her lived experience, her education, and her lifelong learning about BPD, self-injury and trauma, her workshops offer invaluable personal insight and direct experiences.

Discounts:

Discounts of 20 % per person can be offered for agencies that register 5 or more staff

Registration:

3 ways to register:

Register or Learn More

 


Understanding the Culture of Urban Poverty: Building Resilience and Resources in Children & Youth

Keva White, LCADC, LSW, VIP Community Services, Inc.

Date: July 26, 2019
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Fairmount Behavioral Health System, 561 Fairthorne Ave. Philadelphia PA 19128
CEU’S: 5
Cost: $139 per person
*Fee includes CEU’s, presentation, all handouts, certificate, continental breakfast, full buffet lunch, PM refreshments, For more information call 610-203-1926

Description:

The culture of poverty is a concept embedded in social theory that explains the cycle of poverty. Although the title of this workshop points to urban settings, the culture of poverty reflects the concept that the economically disadvantaged possess unique value systems that shape characteristics, behaviors and attitudes of individuals and families regardless of geographic location.

Poverty, coupled with disparities associated with mental health and substance abuse treatment, can create great challenges for individuals, families and communities. This workshop is designed to provide participants with a conceptual framework for understanding the impact of poverty on their clients, provide best practices to enhance provider-client relationships and improve treatment outcomes.

Objectives:

At the end of training participants:

  1. Will be able to identify at least three causations of poverty.
  2. Will restate 3-4 hidden rules of class and their impact on generational (cycle of…) poverty.
  3. Will understand situational vs. structural causations of poverty and poverty maintenance factors
  4. Will understand eight essential resources to combatting poverty
  5. Will be able to describe how perceptions and stereotypes of “poor” people can impact social worker’s ability to engage and empower economically disadvantage individuals, families and communities.

Agenda:

Time: Description:
9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Registration, light continental breakfast
9:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.
Introduction
Review of workshop objectives
Rationale for engaging in cultural competence/diversity work – eliminate disparities; improve quality of service outcomes
NASW Code of Ethics (1.05c)
Trainer’s philosophy re: poverty: nobody wants to be poor, relativity of poverty, dichotomous nature of poverty, cognitive dissonance created by being poor in America.
10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Segment One
A framework for understanding poverty: Resources, Resilience and Relationships! (R3)
Working definitions: poverty, culture and persistent poverty; Social theorist perspective(s) on causations of poverty; Situational vs. Structural Causations of poverty; Poverty Maintenance Factors – social welfare policy (help or hindrance), media portrayal of poor people, legal system
10:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Segment Two
The working poor!; Income and Poverty; Understanding the Hidden Rule of Class; Eight Essential Resources to combatting poverty – money, physical health, mental/cognitive, emotional/self-regulation, role models, support system, spiritual and knowledge of Hidden Rules; Film Review & Analysis: Boys from Baraka
12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Lunch- buffet lunch provided
1:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Segment Three
Resilience as a tool of empowerment; What is resilience? Characteristics of resilient children living in poverty; Three types of resilience: Overcoming the Odds, Surviving Traumatic Event, Sustained Competence in Stressful Environment; The Three Doctors! – a model of urban youth surviving poverty
2:15 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Segment Four
Defining generational poverty; Characteristics of generational poverty; Hierarchical structures of impoverished families; Causations and Predictors of generational poverty; Case Analysis
2:45 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Break
3:15 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.
Segment Five
Overcoming perceptions & stereotypes; Cultural iceberg analogy – how we build relationships cross-culturally; Group Activity: The Perception Test – “Getting Off Automatic”; Cumulative Impact of Poverty on children/families; Breaking the Cycle of Poverty; Overview of Effective Strategies and Interventions
3:50 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Q&A/Evaluations
Open floor for questions, comments and closing remarks; Participants complete and submit workshop evaluations; Distribute certificates ; Adjourn

CEU Hours:

This event is co-sponsored by Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research (GSSWSR) for a maximum of 5 credit hours. Bryn Mawr College GSSWSR, as a CSWE accredited School of Social Work, is a pre-approved provider of continuing education for Social Workers, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists in Pennsylvania and many other states.

About the Speaker

Keva White, LCADC, LSW, Mr. White is a dually licensed professional with over 20 years of experience working in the substance abuse and mental health fields both on programmatic and systems level within urban settings. He has served as trainer and consultant for New Jersey Alliance of Family Support Organizations, American Institute for Research and the Georgetown University Training Institutes on Cultural and Linguistic competence. He is trained through the National Multicultural Institute and is a certified cultural competence trainer who is called upon nationally. Mr. White also teaches on the graduate level at Rutgers University School of Social Work. He currently serves as board co-chairman for New Jersey Social Workers Scholarship, Education & Research Corporation. He is most recognized for his high energy, creatively balanced, experiential and valued based presentation style.

Discounts:

Discounts of 20 % per person are offered to agencies that register 5 or more staff

Registration:

3 ways to register:

Register or Learn More

 


Working with Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Persons Sensitively

Date: August 15, 2019
Time: 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Location: Fairmount Behavioral Health System, 561 Fairthorne Ave. Philadelphia PA 19128
CEU’S: 5
Cost: $139 per person, lunch included
*Fee includes 5 CEU’s, presentation, all handouts, certificate, continental breakfast, buffet lunch, PM refreshments, For more information call 610-203-1926

Description:

This workshop provides an opportunity to increase awareness and sensitivity and to develop skills in working with persons who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer (LGBTQ).

Workshop Objectives:

At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Understand personal and societal biases and stereotypes that impact LGBTQ persons
  • Identify appropriate terminology and concepts pertaining to LGBTQ culture
  • Examine current emotional, mental, and environmental challenges that are specific to LGBTQ persons
  • Practice and implement sensitive communication and support approaches toward relationship building and trust with LGBTQ persons

This dynamic, interactive program will include individual and small group activities, and discussions.

Agenda:

Time: Description:
9:00 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. Registration, continental breakfast
9:30 a.m. – 10:15 a.m. Welcome; Societal biases and stereotypes (small group activity)
10:15 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Terminology and concepts pertinent to LGBTQ culture
11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. Break
11:15 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Part 1 of emotional, mental, environmental challenges specific to LGBTQ
12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Lunch (buffet provided)
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. Part 2 of emotional, mental, environmental challenges specific to LGBTQ
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Break
2:45 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Communication and support approaches with LGBTQ persons (practice opportunities with real scenarios in small group role plays; evaluation, closing

CEU Hours:

This event is co-sponsored by Bryn Mawr College Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research (GSSWSR) for a maximum of 5 credit hours. Bryn Mawr College GSSWSR, as a CSWE accredited School of Social Work, is a pre-approved provider of continuing education for Social Workers, professional counselors, and marriage and family therapists in Pennsylvania and many other states.

About the Speaker:

Kerry Arnold, M.S.W., LSW is a Full Time Instructor and Curriculum Coordinator in the Behavioral Health/Human Services program at the Community College of Philadelphia. Kerry is a Licensed Social Worker and received her M.S.W. from Temple University. For 32 years, she has been a behavior specialist, educator, and consultant to a myriad of agencies in the Tri-State area serving individuals with intellectual disabilities and co-occurring disorders, which include substance abuse.

Kerry has presented at city, state and national conferences in the area of recovery-centered, behavioral support planning for individuals receiving behavioral health services. Since 2008, she has been a primary consultant in New Jersey’s dual-disordered initiative in, spearheaded by Rutgers University. Kerry co-hosts a television show sponsored by the Community College of Philadelphia, Tapestry of Life, which features interviews with people who have a lived or direct support experience with some aspect of behavioral health/stigma and oppression and their path toward healing.

Discounts:

Discounts of 20 % per person can be offered for agencies that register 5 or more staff

Registration:

3 ways to register:

Register or Learn More